Author Topic: Law and Order SVU  (Read 1130 times)

Offline Eve.

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Law and Order SVU
« on: June 22, 2014, 11:30:30 PM »
Ok, so this isn't a movie but...

the first 3 minutes of Law & Order SVU. DAMN! Yes please!

What are your favorite episode interludes?
Any man can grab a woman and throw her by her hair onto a bed, call her a slut and violate her but that is just rough sex. True dominance is the ability to whisper in her ear and observe as she obediently takes off her clothing. Methodically one piece at a time. Watching as she kneels before you offering her entire self to you. Willingly without reservation or hesitation. She will show you her most vulnerable self without reservation. And you will know nothing else satisfies her than making you happy...

Offline GEMINIGUY

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #1 on: June 23, 2014, 12:22:41 AM »
They haven't aired it yet. ;-) Olivia Benson getting wildly fucked,  as she and her lover are all sweaty and exhausted she gets a call to come to a crime. ;-)
"If it's good enough for the Gemini Guys
Then it's good enough for me" - Adam Ant

"IT IS THE TALE, NOT HE WHO TELLS IT"
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Offline Eve.

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #2 on: June 23, 2014, 01:27:08 AM »
They haven't aired it yet. ;-) Olivia Benson getting wildly fucked,  as she and her lover are all sweaty and exhausted she gets a call to come to a crime. ;-)


Ohhh they had one close to it! Did you ever see the episode where they had to put her on desk duty because they went to raid an office and it was a fake set up with her name spelt backwards as the company's name. Her stalker even know she was a product of rape. He knew everything about her, even where she lived....
Any man can grab a woman and throw her by her hair onto a bed, call her a slut and violate her but that is just rough sex. True dominance is the ability to whisper in her ear and observe as she obediently takes off her clothing. Methodically one piece at a time. Watching as she kneels before you offering her entire self to you. Willingly without reservation or hesitation. She will show you her most vulnerable self without reservation. And you will know nothing else satisfies her than making you happy...

Offline GEMINIGUY

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #3 on: June 23, 2014, 04:11:21 AM »
That doesn't sound too familiar, but I know Olivia has had a few weirdos stalking her, like that creep this past season. He gave me the willies...
"If it's good enough for the Gemini Guys
Then it's good enough for me" - Adam Ant

"IT IS THE TALE, NOT HE WHO TELLS IT"
- Unknown

Offline Eve.

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #4 on: June 24, 2014, 06:56:04 AM »
That doesn't sound too familiar, but I know Olivia has had a few weirdos stalking her, like that creep this past season. He gave me the willies...

Found it! Episode 2 Season 3 Wrath


As the episode opens, two forensics doctors are in their experimental site (a federal facility referred to as a "body farm") studying the effects of decomposition on bodies. As they check, one of the doctors stumbles over three dead bodies tied together who aren't part of the experiment. SVU is called and Detective Stabler arrives on the scene. Upon questioning, Stabler finds out that the bodies were dragged to the area. IDs include an adult Hispanic female who had been a rape victim and whose case was previously handled by SVU. Detective Benson had been the primary investigator on the case. The white male was the father of a rape victim and had also been one of Detective Benson's cases. The minor's identity has yet to be determined.
Back at the station house, Benson asked Stabler why she wasn't called since she had been the primary on all three cases. Arriving in the squad room, Benson relays to the squad the identifications of all three victims. Victim #1 was Peter Cordell, the father of a woman who had been raped and murdered. Benson handled his case, including driving him back and forth to court each day, and even held his hand when his daughter's killer, Victor Klaussen, was acquitted due a lab mix-up which contaminated the evidence. Victim #2 was Carmella Barrantes who had been raped and beaten three years ago by a gang banger currently serving 8 – 10 years in prison. Stabler offers that this clears the man as the murderer in this case, but Fin and Cragen consider the possibility of gang revenge although noting that there's no evidence of a gang-related link with the other two victims. Benson continues with victim #3 who was Clayton Derricks. The young boy had been physically abused by his father, Bruce Derricks. Clayton was removed from his home and placed in a group home where he was again sodomized by an older boy, then he was placed in foster care and Benson confesses how long it took for him to begin to trust her. Munch adds that the boy's foster mother had filed a missing person's report the previous day. He also adds that cause of death for all three victims was a combination of sedatives and potassium chloride which made for painless deaths. Cragen orders the squad to interview the families and find a common connection other than Benson.
Benson and Stabler go to Adam Cordell's home and ask the young man if his father might have known Carmella Barrantes or Clayton Derricks. Adam says he never mentioned those names. He says Victor Klaussen killed his sister and probably killed his Dad. He said that Klaussen was laying carpet in Queens. He added Klaussen was married with a baby on the way. Benson asked Cordell if he had been stalking Klaussen. He replied that he hadn't, but his father used to follow him and tell everyone around him what kind of person Klaussen was and that probably got Peter Cordell killed. Benson and Stabler decide to pay a visit to Klaussen. They ask him to account for his movements, but he is not willing to comply. When he begins making backhanded remarks, Stabler throws him against his van and tells him they ought to arrest him for making threatening remarks. Klaussen says that two nights ago he was at home, and last night he and his wife were at Lamaze class.
Mrs. Harding's Foster Home is the stop for Fin and Munch. Mrs. Harding said Clayton was pretty stable considering his circumstances, but he would occasionally run away. We he did run away, he went to see his friend Michael Washington at the group home in the Bronx. At the group home, the director said that Clayton and Michael bonded over their similar circumstances of abusive fathers. He also said that the psychologists thought it was better to move Clayton for his own well-being, and Mrs. Harding had called the home after Clayton went missing to see if he was there, but neither they nor Michael had seen Clayton in some time. When Fin and Munch talk to Michael directly, he admits that he did see Clayton the day before. Michael said that Clayton had received a letter that he had won a computer, but needed cab fare. Michael gave Clayton all he had - $22.00. Michael watched Clayton get in the cab from Starling Car Service to go and pick it up.
At the Barrantes residence, Carmella's mother said that her daughter never went out after dark, but she was getting her life together and going back to school. She tells that her daughter was excited because she had received a letter saying she had won a computer in a raffle.
Back at the squad room, Stabler says it didn't seem that any of the victims knew one another. Benson adds that, so far, they hadn't been able to track down Clayton's father. Fin says that they checked back and Peter Cordell had received a letter saying he had won a new computer just like Clayton had. Benson adds that Mrs. Barrantes said Carmella had received the same letter. Munch hangs up the phone and says that he talked to the cab company and got the address in Chelsea where the boy was dropped off. Benson says they're going to need a warrant.
Detectives Benson, Stabler, Munch, and Fin go to the address, and the building owner meets them there. He says he never met the guy; the whole rental agreement was done by phone. He paid the owner six months rent in advance, and the owner left the key above the door since there was nothing to steal. "AivilO Productions" was in the business of designing promotional literature. A search of the office turns up several computer letters like the ones the victims received. Stabler notes the two glasses where he must have offered his victims a drink laced with valium or some other sedative. Benson closes the door and reveals the reverse of "AivilO" on the window portion of the door. From the backside it reads "OliviA".
Back in the squad room, Huang briefs the detectives on the killer's profile. The three victims, being of different races, genders, and ages, indicate the perp was after revenge and the real target was Detective Benson. She has enraged the perp so much that he wants her twisting. The fact that the victims were placed in a federal facility indicates that he wanted attention for them. The perp used potassium chloride (as in a death row cocktail) and posed the dead victims indicating he wanted them not to be any pain. Cragen puts Munch and Fin on the detail of checking Benson's old case files and seeing who might hold a grudge. Benson and Stabler are sent to follow the money trail. At the bank, they find out that the account was opened four months ago. Only photocopies are available of the checks so no fingerprints are available. The detectives ask the bank to not physically handle any checks that come through on that account so that prints can be checked. As they exit the bank, Benson is disgruntled that the FBI will be handling the prints. Stabler says they're just better equipped and quicker. Benson gets a phone call that Clayton's father, Bruce Derricks, has been arrested on a drunk and disorderly charge. At the jail, they interview the man to see if he has had any recent contact with his son or anyone asking about him. He turned on the detectives, saying it was their fault he was taken and raped in the group home. He gives no further information. After the detectives leave, Stabler expresses concern for Benson's safety. Benson replies that if he had wanted to take her out, he would have already done so. The detectives continue to interview parolees that may have had a grudge against Benson, but they continue to come up with no solid leads.
Benson and Stabler next travel to the flower shop of Eric Plummer's ex-wife. As it turns out, the innocent Eric Plummer spent 7 years in prison for attempted murder and rape. DNA evidence not available at the time cleared him. Ms. Plummer says she doesn't know where her ex-husband is and wouldn't tell the detectives if she did. As they leave, Stabler invites Benson over for dinner. Benson declines.
As Benson sleeps, the buzzer to her apartment is rung. She answers, but no one replies. Then it rings again without stopping. Benson grabs her gun, goes down stairs, and finds the buzzer has been purposely jammed. In front of the building, in a box marked "From AivilO Productions", is the dead body of Clayton's father, Bruce Derricks. Unlike the other victims, Bruce Derricks had suffered in death. FBI agents question whether Benson has seen or heard anything. Then he tells Benson that Derricks was alive until she went to talk to him. He concludes that Benson needs police protection because she is being stalked. Benson says she doesn't work for him and asks who bailed Derricks out from jail. The agent says that according to police forms, it was her. Benson and Stabler go to the Lonnie's Bail Bonds office and ask to see the paperwork on Bruce Derricks. Lonnie said the guy by the name of Oliver Benson paid cash, so he didn't take an ID. Uncooperative as he is, Benson and Stabler start moving people out of the office. Lonnie then gives a vague description of what he remembers about the guy.
Cragen is strong-armed by the FBI to put Benson on desk duty, but he doesn't relent. He comes out to ask the squad if there are any leads. Stabler comes up with a lead – a 45 minute call from Plummer to a Baseline Labs in Midtown. Fin adds if Plummer works for the lab, he'd have access to potassium chloride. Munch says the autopsy report on Derrick reveals that he suffered. He was awake and aware, but paralyzed when he was suffocated. Benson says that the killer saw Derricks as a perp and killed him like one. Cragen orders Benson and Stabler to the lab to check out employees. Cragen tells Benson he's worried about her safety. Benson says "no protective detail. She says this perp doesn't want her dead; he wants her twisting and obsessing about what's going on.
At Baseline Labs, the director says he doesn't have an Eric Plummer working for him. When they show him Plummer's mug shot, he says that it looks like Norman Webber. He works for their insurance sector collecting blood and urine samples from clients for physicals. Benson asks to see his personnel file. The man is flustered and offers that their company has a rigorous screening process. If this man is a criminal, they could be in big trouble for hiring him in the first place. Stabler says the man is not an ex-con, but needs to call them as soon as possible.
Back at the station, Benson steps into Huang's office. Benson says that the perp hates her and is killing the people she tried to help. Huang shares that one time while working an FBI case, he misinterpreted the amount of time it would take for a perp to try to kill him before the guards could get there. Benson understands – the perp got in his head just like this one is in hers. Huang says this perp is enacting psychological warfare. The fact that he had posed the bodies in a comforting position and used potassium chloride so that they would suffer painless deaths indicates that the perp, in his own mind, is freeing them from the miserable existence he must feel that Benson left them in. Somehow he identifies with the victims and sees himself as a victim, too.
Back in the main squad room Plummer arrives with his attorney. Novak tells the two that this is simply an ongoing investigation, and when they clear him, Mr. Plummer can put this behind him. The attorney says he must insist on Benson's absence from the meeting. Benson says that's not a problem, she was leaving anyway. Munch tells Benson that they're heading to Chauncey's (bar). Plummer's attorney says that his client has already been wrongly convicted and spent seven years falsely imprisoned. Stabler says those seven years must have given him plenty of time to plan his revenge. Novak tells Plummer he wasn't personally sent there by Benson. He had been convicted by a jury in a fair trial. Plummer turns to Novak and asks if she's ever been to prison – arrested, cuffed, fingerprinted, beaten, raped, and tortured. If not, then don't dismiss his feelings. Stabler asks Plummer why he changed his name to Norman. Plummer says he wanted a fresh start. Stabler then asks what drugs he had access to including potassium chloride. Plummer says he doesn't even know what that is. The attorney presents Plummer's work records for the last two evenings and says that he doesn't have an alibi for his evenings because he lives alone, but this time circumstantial evidence won't cut it. The two leave. Novak says he's right. If they want to get a conviction for this, they're going to have to prove he had the syringe in his hand. Stabler says he thinks Plummer is the guy. Cragen agrees. He tells Stabler to follow up on Plummer's seven years in prison. He had to have made a friend there.
At the bar, Munch tries to convince Benson it wasn't her fault that Plummer went down. A witness picked him out of a lineup. Fin adds that the guy couldn't provide an alibi. Benson asks him to remember where he was at a specific time a couple of weeks ago and his inability to do so proves her point that sometimes it's hard to remember your exact whereabouts for a given time. Benson says that it was her evidence that helped put him away on such a weak case, and even one wrongfully imprisoned man is too many. She goes on to point out that Plummer was a victim. Munch says if he's the right guy, he's a predator, not a victim. Benson calls it a night and leaves the bar. As she walks down the street, she is aware of a man following her. She pulls her gun and turns on him. The man says he's FBI. While Benson has him pinned and looking for ID, she spots Plummer walking down the opposite side of the street observing her. She turns to go after Plummer when a second FBI man stops her. She asks who they are and why they are following her. They admit that they are protective detail requested by Detective Stabler. Benson goes straight to Stabler's house and tells him that "only the rat squad puts cops on other cops without telling them" and she deserves better than that. She ends the conversation with the statement, "When you can't trust your partner, Elliot, it's time to get a new one."
The next day, Benson is in Novak's office. Benson tells Novak that warrants have been issued in the past for less, why not now? Novak replies that once a judge knows of Plummer's wrongful conviction, that judge is going to bend over backwards for him. Benson says she saw Plummer and knows he is stalking her. Novak asks how Plummer could have known where she was. Benson says he must have overheard them in the squad room. Novak counters by asking how many businesses were in the area because any decent defense attorney will say he was just running errands. Benson argues that he has killed four people and they aren't doing anything about it. Novak looks at Benson and asks how many drinks she had that night. Benson is clearly irritated with this question. Novak continues that since the system made a mistake before, everything they do is under a microscope. Benson stares at Novak and says, "I wasn't drunk." She storms out of Novak's office and goes to Cragen's office asking for permission to take the vacation time she has coming because she knows she's too close to the case. Cragen offers that no one is questioning her ability. Benson says, "I am."
In the central squad room, Cragen asks Stabler, Fin, and Munch if they've followed up on information about Plummer in prison. Munch says Plummer corresponded with his wife almost daily, even after their divorce. Stabler asks who his cell-mate was. Fin says it was a murderer by the name of Russell Williams who was parolled in 2000, but is currently at Riker's awaiting trial in another murder case. Cragen says Williams is going to want to cut a deal but if the prosecution has a good case, they're not going to want to cut him any slack. Novak goes to the ADA in charge of Williams' case. The ADA says no deal. Novak asks if they want her to show the rotting corpse of a ten year-old boy. The ADA argues that this time they could put him away for good. Novak asks them to go for twelve and a half to twenty-five if they can get information to put Plummer away. He agrees.
At Riker's, Williams says that Plummer had it in for some female cop. The two ADAs say they need proof. Williams says he handed over several letters to his old lady from Plummer to give to Plummer's wife. Williams further adds that if he spilled his guts to his cell-mate, imagine what must be in the letters to Plummer's wife. The detectives carry out the warrant they have for Plummer's apartment. Fin finds a loose tile and pries it up to find a box containing vials of potassium chloride. Stabler says it's time to pick up Plummer. He heads to the lab to ask if Plummer is working that day. The irritated boss says that this is harassment. He knows of the story where Norman (Plummer) was wrongfully convicted. He tells Stabler that his partner has already been in threatening obstruction and he gave her the address just so she'd leave. Stabler asks what the address is.
Benson enters an apartment building, and almost immediately hears shots fired within the first apartment. She calls for backup. A woman opens the door. Plummer is out of the doorframe, but has a gun pointed at her head. Crying, the woman says that he knew she was coming. She says that Plummer is going to kill her. Benson says it won't. The woman says that Plummer wants her to tell Benson that they were suffering and he only helped alleviate the misery Benson had put them in. The woman says Plummer wants her to come in. When Benson says she can't, Plummer pulls the crying woman into another room. Benson yells that she's coming in. With gun drawn, she enters the room where Plummer has the gun drawn on the woman. Benson says to let the woman go because this is between the two of them. Plummer asks Benson how it feels to have your credibility shot and your life in ruins. Benson replies, "It sucks." Plummer says he was innocent. Benson agrees, but adds that now he has killed four innocent people. Plummer says it was three innocent people and one child molester. Benson offers to testify on his behalf in court that she was responsible. Plummer says there's not going to be a trial. Benson keeps her gun pointed on Plummer and tells him not to think she won't shoot him. Plummer says he's counting on it. He pushes the woman down and the gun harder against her head. Benson tells him to drop his weapon. Plummer says there are no bullets in his gun and then makes to shoot his victim, but Benson fires at Plummer, killing him instantly. The entry squad and detectives arrive on the scene immediately after. While Stabler takes the gun from Benson's hand, the first entry cop checks Plummer's gun and reveals that it wasn't loaded. The grief-stricken Benson is speechless. Stabler offers to drive her home, but Benson says she has to give her statement. Stabler says he'll take her, but Benson tells him to stay away from her.
Back in Benson's apartment, she is sitting in the dark as the rain falls outside the windows. As tears roll down her cheeks, she ignores both the knocking at the door and the ringing phone. In the hallway, Stabler looks at the door, closes his cell phone, and walks away.
Any man can grab a woman and throw her by her hair onto a bed, call her a slut and violate her but that is just rough sex. True dominance is the ability to whisper in her ear and observe as she obediently takes off her clothing. Methodically one piece at a time. Watching as she kneels before you offering her entire self to you. Willingly without reservation or hesitation. She will show you her most vulnerable self without reservation. And you will know nothing else satisfies her than making you happy...

Offline GEMINIGUY

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #5 on: June 24, 2014, 03:02:48 PM »
I still love Law & Order: SVU but it's not the same without Det. Stabler.
"If it's good enough for the Gemini Guys
Then it's good enough for me" - Adam Ant

"IT IS THE TALE, NOT HE WHO TELLS IT"
- Unknown

Offline Eve.

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #6 on: June 26, 2014, 03:48:24 PM »
I still love Law & Order: SVU but it's not the same without Det. Stabler.


He was my favorite!!! Have you seen him in other movies? He is usually playing a gay man in them which is so out of character as I know him. He was in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas and ohhhh his character in Oz, very nice!

On another note my company just did a job for Ice-T and Coco. They were so down to earth! I wish I could use that connection to meet Chris and Mariska but that would be inappropriate!
Any man can grab a woman and throw her by her hair onto a bed, call her a slut and violate her but that is just rough sex. True dominance is the ability to whisper in her ear and observe as she obediently takes off her clothing. Methodically one piece at a time. Watching as she kneels before you offering her entire self to you. Willingly without reservation or hesitation. She will show you her most vulnerable self without reservation. And you will know nothing else satisfies her than making you happy...

Offline Tony V.

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #7 on: June 26, 2014, 06:23:38 PM »
If you get the chance, check out Chris Meloni's new show, "Surviving Jack" I find it hysterically written and well acted. It shows a side of Chris Meloni's acting ability rarely seen on "S V U"

Tony V.                    :police:
"Just turn around, put your hands behind you, and do what the Officer tells you"

Offline GEMINIGUY

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Re: Law and Order SVU
« Reply #8 on: June 26, 2014, 11:52:19 PM »
Sadly, FOX cancelled Surviving Jack. And it was refreshing to see a show that didn't portray a parent as the idiot.
He's been on HBO's True Blood also, right?
"If it's good enough for the Gemini Guys
Then it's good enough for me" - Adam Ant

"IT IS THE TALE, NOT HE WHO TELLS IT"
- Unknown