Ravishment University

THE UNIVERSITY => Extracurricular Studies => Topic started by: RopeFiend on October 09, 2008, 01:40:38 AM

Title: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 09, 2008, 01:40:38 AM
<split off of another thread so that USEFUL info isn't corrupted with rants about another RC asshole>

I'm in full agreement with Emily... ANYONE and EVERYONE here is welcome to use a proxy, and you're encouraged to if you're in the UK or some other barbaric nation that forbids consensual BDSM play or fiction.  We don't want anyone to feel threatened by exploring a fantasy that's perfectly acceptable in most of the rest of the Educated World.  Nothing here WAS illegal in the UK before the 'anti violence' thing they passed several months ago, and as loosely as that crappy piece of legislation is worded several themes or topics here MAY be illegal in the UK now. 

(http://i33.tinypic.com/azgnbp.jpg)

I probably ought to do a 'Proxies 101' tutorial for our friends and less savvy guests in the UK that SHOULD be using a proxy when surfing RavishU or any of the 'forced' forums.  I'm not sure that we cross their fuzzy morality line, but I don't want any of you good folks to be the ones that find out otherwise when a Bobby knocks at your door.

Lydia, just as a suggestion: pick a different proxy than the one you're currently using.  If the English take it in their head to start tracking IPs to suspected 'morally offensive' sites, then the proxy needs to run a spoofed channel between you and itself, AND it needs to be located outside of the UK zone.  Your proxy is bound by UK law since the server for magiclema.com is in London.

I'm blocking a LOT of server farms that have attacked us, but I'm not intentionally blocking any proxies.  If I ever do accidentally shut down a proxy (it's quite possible) and anyone gets the dreaded 403 FORBIDDEN message, then kindly switch to a different proxy and let me know which one you were using, and I'll unblock it.  When I send an attack log to the abuse@ contact for a server that's attacking RU or Kristen's, I give them 2 weeks for a response.  If the attacks continue and I don't get a response, I block their entire network range.  I care about OUR security as much as I care about YOUR security.  I can unblock single IP addresses or ranges within a blocked network very easily if there's ever a problem.
Title: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: SubJo on October 10, 2008, 11:33:15 AM

Ummmm, Rope? That tutorial you mentioned, would you be kind enough to either post that information or maybe drop me a line and we could hook up YIM? I know just enough about computer to get myself in trouble if I go messing with stuff like that.  :]

Thanks!!
Title: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: the_lecher on October 10, 2008, 11:54:00 AM
Hey, Rope, there's some information on that in this thread: http://ravishu.com/forums/index.php?topic=11034.0

Unfortunately, I don't know enough on the subject to really be useful.  Maybe you could fill in the gaping holes I left over there?
Title: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 10, 2008, 12:11:00 PM
I'll write it up and post it out in the open for everyone.  In this current environment of religious nutcases trying to censor the entire Internet, it's something a number of you might want or need.

(http://i34.tinypic.com/2ro6s2e.jpg)  (http://i38.tinypic.com/nmdz7t.gif)

Let's begin.  Run over to http://tools.rosinstrument.com/cgi-proxy.htm and play around with the tools they've kindly provided.

These are all 'anonymous' proxies at Rosinstrument.  The difference is that non-anonymous proxies MAY still include your IP address in one of the referrer headers.  With anonymous proxies that doesn't happen and you're at least somewhat hidden.  AOL and Hughes Networks hide ALL of their users behind anonymizing proxy servers, so folks on those networks don't have to worry as much unless they're hiding their surfing from their ISP or a packet/wifi sniffer.

If you're being tracked or blocked due to the URL or page content, an even better method is to use an HTTPS proxy (just check the box at Rosinstrument).  That encrypts the link between you and the proxy server, and all your ISP (or a packet sniffer / wifi sniffer) can see is a mess of encrypted packets, and they have NO easy way to see where you're surfing.  I'm sure the NSA has ways around HTTPS encryption, but you'd have to be doing something HORRIBLY illegal to get them interested in you.  HTTPS proxies are usually heavily loaded with school kids trying to get to MySpace or porn sites at school, so they're frequently slower than other proxies.  In general, most people probably don't need them.

A side benefit to using an HTTPS proxy is that NONE of the information is stored on your computer once you close your browser.  If you're surfing from work, they can't come along later and look at your browsing history or cache and see what you were looking at.  8)

For speed reasons, it's best to choose a proxy either in the country you live in, or where the site you're surfing is located.  You can use a proxy in a different country to get around a country block on your location, or to make it seem like you live somewhere else.  You shouldn't take for granted where a server is located, as some sites use stealthing services.  Rapeboard is a good example.  It *looks* like their server is located in Pennsylvania, but a traceroute tells a different story.  ;)   I ran a traceroute on them, and it hopped from the US to the Netherlands, then into Poland before suddenly hopping back to Pennsylvania.  Yeah, sure.  I'm almost certain they're hosted in Moscow, no matter what their stealthing server is reporting.

Here's what the page at Rosinstrument looks like.  It's a handy service that I use frequently, depending on what I'm surfing for.  Just enter your URL and surf away!  As you click around, it intercepts the clicks and routes all requests through the proxy server you're on, and Voila! you're hidden from normal sight.

(http://i33.tinypic.com/10f572x.jpg)


Monty Python - H.M. Government Public Services film No. 42: How Not To Be Seen  :emot_rotf.gif:

Title: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on October 10, 2008, 01:38:42 PM
Great posts RF!  I've learned more about proxies than I knew before.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 11, 2008, 12:25:01 AM
Back to the Rosinstrument page!

One of the options is "increase anonymity by chaining CGI PROXY".  Leave it set at SINGLE.
What that does is to further obfuscate your tracks by going through 2 or more proxies.  The ONLY people that need that level of anonymity are baboons surfing for kiddie porn (say "Hi!", Jamie), people trying to hack into banks / Milnet, or similar highly illegal actions.  Surfing for 'rough sex' ain't even remotely in that ball park.  By using multiple proxies, you're hoping that at least one of them doesn't log accesses, so any vigorous attempt to back-track you will hit a dead-end.  Anyone going that route typically picks a series of proxies in several different countries to make it harder for the authorities to get warrants to view ALL of the server logs.

Again, leave 'chaining' at SINGLE.  Even if 'forced sex roleplay' is illegal in your country, it's a minor infraction, not worth spending the effort to find you past the first proxy server.  Chaining proxies also slows your surfing dramatically... it could take several seconds more per page hit, maybe much more.

-------------------------------------------------------

If you're using a single truly anonymous proxy, you're fine.  There's a couple of different ways that you can make sure the proxy is truly anonymous.  First, go to http://whatismyip.com and copy & paste that number (your IP address) into a notepad/Wordpad text file.  If you have photographic memory, skip that last step.

Next, hook up your proxy and go to one of the services that shows all of the request variables:
http://www.2privacy.com/www/IP_Check_IP_Address/Proxy_Judge_Test.html


If you don't see your IP address in there anywhere, then it's an anonymous proxy; you're good.  Here's an example, first surfing in the open, followed by surfing through a proxy:

(http://img186.imagevenue.com/loc247/th_77203_headers1_122_247lo.jpg) (http://img186.imagevenue.com/img.php?loc=loc247&image=77203_headers1_122_247lo.jpg) (http://img22.imagevenue.com/loc922/th_77209_headers2_122_922lo.jpg) (http://img22.imagevenue.com/img.php?loc=loc922&image=77209_headers2_122_922lo.jpg)  Ahhhh, sweet stealth!


I'll continue with another important use of proxies in the next part of the tutorial.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 11, 2008, 10:29:13 AM
Quote
I was recently tracked down by someone I met on another site like this. We had been emailing fantasies to each other's Yahoo accounts. He was able to get my IP from my email and then found me in person. It was a terrible and scary experience. My question is this: how do you all email anonymously?

http://www.geobytes.com/iplocator.htm  << try this to see if your location is normally hidden by a proxy

ed. note: she lives in a small town, so it was easy to find her.  You're harder to track in a large metropolitan area

I'll show you the same simple trick here to hide your e-mail information.

First, you need to use a free web-based email account (Yahoo or Google's Gmail).  I can't recommend MSN/Hotmail due to the Microsoft Passport it requires to login.  Microsoft does everything in their power to VIOLATE your privacy, and I'm not sure how much info their Passport stores permanently or forwards to others.  Just consider Microsoft to be Big Brother.

 (http://img145.imagevenue.com/loc607/th_35185_Big_Brother3_122_607lo.jpg) (http://img145.imagevenue.com/img.php?image=35185_Big_Brother3_122_607lo.jpg)

When you SEND an email using one of these free services, make sure you've logged into your email account using one of the HTTPS proxies (see the previous post).  You have to check the HTTPS box because both Yahoo and Google have HTTPS-secure logins, and the non-HTTPS proxies will not allow you to login to your account.

(http://img189.imagevenue.com/loc70/th_79961_proxy_https_122_70lo.jpg) (http://img189.imagevenue.com/img.php?loc=loc70&image=79961_proxy_https_122_70lo.jpg)

Note: with Yahoo, you have to first log in normally at some point and turn off their glitzy new mail interface by clicking the CLASSIC MAIL link. I could *not* get anything to work through the proxy until I got rid of the new style.  Both versions of Gmail work fine through the proxies I've tried.

I'll show you a quick example, first logged in directly to Yahoo, then a second test logged in via a web proxy.

(http://img149.imagevenue.com/loc874/th_79815_unproxied3_122_874lo.jpg) (http://img149.imagevenue.com/img.php?loc=loc874&image=79815_unproxied3_122_874lo.jpg)

and after logging in through the proxy:

(http://img37.imagevenue.com/loc1019/th_79836_proxied4_122_1019lo.jpg) (http://img37.imagevenue.com/img.php?loc=loc1019&image=79836_proxied4_122_1019lo.jpg)

The pink box in the first test was my REAL IP address, included in the email header.  :o
The highlighted section in the second test is the address of the proxy server.  8)

End result: yes, you CAN send e-mail anonymously, as long as you're careful.  You don't have to mess with a proxy if you're just READING mail, only if you're SENDING it.  It's a bit of a pain in the ass initially, but once you've done it a few times and checked to make sure that your real IP address is hidden, you're safer.  Click on the FULL HEADERS at the lower-right of the message view pane at Yahoo so you can see the full message headers of your test email.  If you send a test message to your home email account (Outlook, Thunderbird or other email client) then you'll have to find the RAW HEADERS or FULL MESSAGE view for your client.

You don't need to mess with a proxy if you're just READING your web mail, only if you want to WRITE or REPLY to a message.

(http://i37.tinypic.com/10da43r.gif)
   Be safe, have fun!
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: NathanL on October 15, 2008, 11:37:48 PM
Ok, what's the advantage to this over using something like the tor bundle (which I like because it picks out proxies for you)?
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Catalina Cat on October 16, 2008, 01:46:47 AM
I've used the tor bundle but didn't like how it interfered with my computer's performance, plus I had to do a system restore back to factory specs to get it off my system!
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 16, 2008, 08:12:34 AM
I like simple and easy.  There's nothing to install and configure if you're using this proxy list.

You have a HIGH likelihood of winding up on various blacklists (if you configure it to include you in the relay network) since some of the slightly brighter script kiddies use Tor.  When you use the Tor network, you're using other people's PCs to surf and do 'stuff'; likewise they're using YOUR PC (if you're a relay point) to surf and do 'stuff'.  Some of it is just innocent surfing, desiring a bit of privacy / anonymity.  Some of it is script kiddies attacking web servers or spammers filling your mailbox with crap ads.  I know at least a handful of the blacklist services purposely include anyone in the Tor network, and you're guilty by association.

Check your IP here to see if you've been blacklisted (again, you can get your IP from http://whatismyip.com):

http://isc.sans.org/ipinfo.html?ip=ww.xx.yy.zz   << checks for anyone attacking the Internet
and
http://openrbl.org/client/?query=ww.xx.yy.zz  << combined info from 51 different blacklists / blocklists

(obviously replacing the ww.xx.yy.zz with your actual IP address)

If you're certain you'd never allowed Tor to include you in the relay, you don't need to worry about being blacklisted.  I highly approve of the Tor principles, but it does slow your surfing down quite a bit.

http://www.torproject.org/overview.html.en
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 16, 2008, 11:01:57 AM
Since we're getting a bit deeper into How Not To Be Seen, some quick definitions are needed so we don't confuse the good folks out there in InternetLand.

There are three basic methods of anonymously surfing the Internet, ordered by ease-of-use:

1) Web-based proxy services

2) client software

3) direct proxy configuration


The first method is really easy, you just bookmark a site and then surf using one of the web sites they link to.  No software to install and maintain, it's all click-and-go.  That's what I'd recommended with Rosinstrument (http://tools.rosinstrument.com/cgi-proxy.htm) and other fine sites like them.  If you don't want to mess with Yet Another Piece of balky software or Internet problems, that's the way to go.  However, it may not work for you if you're trying to surf from work or school, as a lot of places have started blocking access to the web-based proxies.  Gee, some employers or schools don't want you surfing MySpace or porn!  How annoying!  ;)  If you're at home, that's not an issue.

The second method requires you to install a piece of software that handles all of the ugly network settings for you, somewhat automatically.  There are pros and cons to this method.  Some of the software only works with the most popular applications like Internet Explorer and Outlook Express, and may not work with more obscure browsers and mail clients.  Some tools are free, some are shareware, some are commercial products (buy it before you try it <puke>).  Here's a handful of different client packages:
Privoxy  http://www.privoxy.org/  (free)
Tor  http://www.torproject.org/  (free)
UltraSurf  http://www.ultrareach.com/  (free)
FreeProxy  http://www.handcraftedsoftware.org/  (free)
Elite Proxy Switcher  http://www.eliteproxyswitcher.com/  (free and Pro versions)
Proxy Switcher  http://www.proxyswitcher.com/  (free and Pro versions)
Ninja Surfing  http://www.ninjasurfing.com/  (free registration required)
(there's literally hundreds of different clients, some are toolbars for IE or Firefox)

Cons to the client software - nearly all of these are using a list of different proxy servers that people have found or identified.  Proxies come and go all the time, so one day your surfing may run REALLY slowly or it may just die with the dreaded UNABLE TO RESOLVE HOST or TIMEOUT error messages, and you have to go hunting a new proxy server.  Also, since you don't know anything about the proxies you're using, you don't know whether they're monitoring what you're doing.  Do you trust an unknown server with the login to your bank?  I certainly don't!  In cases like that, you need a quick and easy switch to turn the proxies off so that you can securely login to banks / PayPal, etc.  That's easy with some clients, harder with others.

The third method is only for geeks.  You can MANUALLY change the network settings for your browser / email / IRC client / etc and use whatever proxy server address and port you choose.  Port??  Isn't that a wine?  Wait, I screwed up and can't get to ANYTHING now!  Oops. 

Yeah, I don't recommend the third method for normal people.  < propeller beanie hats ONLY >

----------------------

If you start playing with the second or third option, you'll come across the ANONYMOUS PROXY LEVEL.  That's a measure of how anonymous the proxy is.  There are 5 levels, with Level 1 being the most anonymous and Level 5 being the least anonymous.  For the most part, you don't need to worry at all as long as it's ANY of the 5 levels.  All of them hide your IP address, the more 'secure' ones just hide additional info like your browser type or operating system.  Then there are transparent proxies, which do NOT hide your IP address.  Obviously, these are a complete waste of time.  With any of the manual or client solutions, you need to periodically check your anonymity to make sure that your IP address is still hidden.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on October 16, 2008, 12:32:22 PM
My favorite proxy server allowed you to pick your IP from a list.  The list included City, State and Country associations.  Unfortuantely it was a pay service and I didnt see the need to continue it when there are so many free services out there.  Still there are advantages to using the same IP everytime you surf certain sites.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: bassaholix on October 17, 2008, 02:03:52 AM
I recommend GPass... :)
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 17, 2008, 05:03:34 AM
Yep, that's one of the 5 tools recommended by the Global Internet Freedom Consortium,
http://www.internetfreedom.org/        http://www.internetfreedom.org/Products-and-Services.html  << edit 2017:  mostly dead links here

I haven't tried all 5 tools yet, but that one looks dead easy to use, AND it works on some of the IM / IRC clients.
It runs a secure tunnel to their proxy servers so that your ISP / school / workplace / totalitarian firewall can't see what you're browsing.

The current version should NOT trip any anti-virus false alarms.  It looks like earlier versions of GPass did.  :P

http://gpass1.com/gpass/  << edit 2017 - looks like GPass is dead, I can't get their site to do anything.


Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on October 20, 2008, 11:09:11 PM
I don't use IM much, so I hadn't looked at it's privacy.  Turns out it's easy to get someone's IP address with most of the clients, all you have to do is SEND them a file.  Whether they accept or refuse it, you still get their IP address.  That's fucked up.

Several of us probably ought to download GPass and see if it effectively hides the most popular IM clients in that situation.  The only one I have here is Trillian, and I've already hacked it last year so that it won't respond to file sending or sharing.  Don't remember where I found the hack or what it was, but I'm outta luck in the testing part.  I hate the Yahoo client, and I'll eat shit and die before I'll install MSN on any of *my* PCs.  And of course you'll NEVER find AIM on anything I own.


Here's what the kiddies are doing to get your IP address:
(hey, THEY already know this stuff, it's only fair that YOU know it, too!)

The first method to get their IP is:-

Get IP via Command Prompt:

1. Goto Start > Run type cmd and open.. or goto Start > Programs > Accessories > Command Prompt and click it.

2. type netstat and hit enter

3. connect to he person (direct connect) with the chat program of your choice. MSN, yahoo, AIM, etc.. This can be done simply by opening a conversation with the target or sending them any file.

4. type netstat again in the command prompt.

collective data should appear in the command box: (infomation censored) (I'll see if I can get ya a screencap later)



The second method is:-

Get IP via MSN logging:

You will need to go into Tools > Options > Connections > Advanced settings and click the Connection Logging checkbox..
open up a Conversation with the target..
Send them like a blank notepad or any file..
Wait for them to cancel it or accept it, either works..

After you've done that go back and turn off your logs or else they will constantly update while you're on MSN..

then goto My Documents > Received files > MsnMsgr (text file), open it with Notepad or Wordpad
Search (ctrl+f) for “Connecttoip” and you will see your selected items..
click the 'Find Next' button until you find the IP address..

Voila! You have the IP address to whomever you attempted to send the file to. Whether they cancel or accept the file doesn't matter because it still logs the IP.  They have to either accept OR deny it; if it just sits there you won't see the IP.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Nero on November 02, 2008, 04:51:41 PM
I recommend GPass... :)

I had a look at it, and its Terms of Service say that it should not be used to access pornographic sites.  Also, they heavily imply that it is only free to use in countries where internet access is restricted, like China.

I'm a bit dubious about using a service based in the USA with those Terms of Service!  I would definitely think that UK users should look elsewhere.

Here is a quote from GPass:

"We feel certain totalitarian states have engaged in malicious suppression of their people's online activities, violating their right to information and freedom of speech. So we created GPass to help you reclaim these basic human rights that you are entitled to.  As a user, you should not use GPass to surf pornographic websites, share documents that are copyright protected, violate another person's rights, or otherwise engage in immoral activities."

Now, you may think that the UK is acting like a totalitarian state, but if you've ever read 1984 you may understand the concept of doublethink.  In this instance, the USA will never regard the UK as acting like a totalitarian state, no matter how much it denies liberties to UK residents, because the UK is an ally of the USA and is therefore part of the "Free World" according to the rules of doublethink.  Only the enemies of the USA can be totalitarian states that deny their citizens freedom, you see.   ::)

More importantly, if you use GPass from within the UK to access this site, or any site that contains "pornographic" content then I suggest that you will leave yourself open to prosecution.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on November 02, 2008, 10:16:56 PM
Yeah, but unless they're monitoring your USE of their program, it'd be hard for them to be upset what it's being used for.

Consensual ADULT porn should be legal.  The fact that the stinkin' Brit government is banning SOME of it because they feel it's unacceptable for ADULTS to view only proves that they're two-faced pricks.  In that case, I wouldn't feel at all bad about protecting my privacy with GPass, whether they want it used that way or not.  When they start blocking sites like this, then you can switch to one of the other options like Tor (which GPass also uses as an alternate route).
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Nero on November 03, 2008, 01:25:30 AM
Yeah, but unless they're monitoring your USE of their program, it'd be hard for them to be upset what it's being used for.

I'm just a bit concerned about how anonymous it actually is - and how quickly they'll start handing over information to the US or UK governments if requested.    They don't give any guarantees about privacy

Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on November 03, 2008, 08:04:35 AM
If they coughed up you info to ANY government for ANY reason, do you think anyone else (worldwide) would ever trust 'em?

They're part of the Internet Freedom Consortium, "Inform, connect, and empower the people in closed societies with information on a free Internet."

As far as I'm concerned, Britain just added themselves to the list.  They may not be AS BAD as China and the Middle East, but they're working on it.  That's what had me incensed about that law in the first place.  They're outlawing LEGAL ACTIONS between consenting adults.  They're as bad as the assholes here in Texass that (until recently) forbade gays, dildos and blowjobs / eatin' pussy.

If Britain throws up a monitoring firewall to block sites, then they're one step closer to China.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: pussycrusher on January 10, 2009, 11:06:49 PM
HELP !!!

I am a total noob to this but i was just messing round with that roinsoft page and now i am able to log in here, the first few attempts came up with error and now i am here but my adress bar is red and one side of it says *certificate error* !

is this normal ?
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on January 10, 2009, 11:15:43 PM
We don't use a server certificate... no 'https' login.  It shouldn't be complaining about that.  Any such certificate would be on the proxy, not us.  If you surf here directly, you shouldn't get that warning.  If you ARE still getting it, then you have a proxy misconfiguration (which can be either simple or ugly to figure out).  In fact, if you TRY to log in here using HTTPS then you'll get a Hosting 404 page, since we're not using the secured protocols.

The simplest application to use is Gpass, http://www.anonym.to/?http://gpass1.com/gpass/

I've tried it, and it's solid.  No dickin' around, it just works.  I've had problems with a lot of the proxies at Rosinstrument when I tried to register at different forums... and that reCAPTCHA we added gives another headache to our friends that want to use them.  It doesn't seem to like MOST of the proxies.


There's also a 'login certificate' on your computer if you're on wireless, based on the encryption method used at the access point.  If that fails, you generally won't get an IP address and you won't be surfing ANYWHERE.  That's buried in the wireless options somewhere, but it'd show up as a Windows error message (on top of everything else on your desktop) and not within a web page warning. 
See this: http://www.it.northwestern.edu/oncampus/wireless/wireless-connections/wireless-win.html
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on January 29, 2009, 06:41:34 PM
Sorry about takin' so long to come up with a solid answer for you, Pussycrusher!

It looks like I need to expand on this a little more.  Internet Explorer is a piece of shit (keep repeating that mantra to yourself.)

EDIT: I've *heard* that if you list the proxy in the 'trusted zone' then IE won't shit all over itself.  Unconfirmed.


IE7 (and probably IE8 as well) has gotten PISSY about a site's 'security certificate', and won't encrypt the link if it thinks there's any issue with the certificate.  The problem is not with RavishU, it's with a number of proxies.  They don't bother to pay the high dollar for 'trusted certificates'... and we shouldn't care either.  For your bank, yes, for PayPal, yes, for a PROXY???  It's unimportant.  However, the security geniuses at Microsoft have decided for you that it IS important, so they refuse to encrypt the link.

That means those of you that are using IE7 or 8 may NOT encrypted even if you're proxied.  If you don't have the little LOCK icon either down at the bottom-right of the IE window or up next to the address bar, then you're surfing without the benefit of an encrypted proxy.  In that case, your ISP can see where you're surfing.

(http://i43.tinypic.com/r1m0cp.gif)  IE 'lock' icon showing encrypted / SSL sessions

(http://i41.tinypic.com/2lk2lpw.gif)  Firefox 'lock' icon showing encrypted / SSL sessions

Since I don't have IE7 or IE8 on any of my computers here, I'll copy some info from another site with the same issues.  I can't verify whether it'll help you, though.

(http://i42.tinypic.com/x35kw5.jpg)

Please click on Continue to this website. You will be presented with the red Address Bar and certificate warning:

(http://i39.tinypic.com/2hgslti.jpg)

Click on the Certificate Error button to open the information window. Click on View Certificates.

(http://i44.tinypic.com/23vnlhf.jpg)

Then click on Install Certificate. You'll see yet another warning. (Click on the image below.) Click on yes, and IE7 will recognize the certificate at future visits using that proxy.

(http://i41.tinypic.com/2aif2u9.jpg)



People, DON'T USE IE.  Firefox doesn't have this issue... if it says HTTPS and you see the lock, you're good.  Firefox is your best choice for surfing the Internet, bar none.  If you're using that diseased old whore from Microsoft (IE) then you're asking for trouble.

This is particularly true with proxies, as a lot of them have expired or 'untrusted' security certificates.  It does NOT mean that they're bad sites, merely that they don't wanna mess with it.  They're providing a service for free, so you can't bitch.


To recap: if you don't see the LOCK icon, then all of your surfing is out in the clear.  Check occasionally.  The lock is only valid for the window or tab that you're using SSL (Secured Socket Layer) with... an HTTPS to a proxy.  If you open up a new tab or window, it's unsecure until you surf to a safe proxy / portal.  Using a web-based proxy (like the one at RosInstrument... http://tools.rosinstrument.com/cgi-proxy.htm) only protects THAT ONE WINDOW OR TAB.  Your ISP and nosy government can still track what you do in unsecured tabs or windows.

All you have to worry about is that the link between you and the proxy is secured (encrypted), and that the proxy is OUTSIDE OF YOUR COUNTRY.  Folks in the UK should probably use German (DE) or US proxies, as they'll be the quickest link between you and us.  If you're surfing to a site elsewhere around the planet, then I'd suggest a German proxy (DE - Deutschland).  Rapeboard's server is in Moscow for instance, so you'd surf there faster with a German proxy.

(http://i43.tinypic.com/2lx6u7d.jpg)

One good thing about using the web-based secured proxies: Both Firefox and IE (and likely all other browsers) will NOT cache the pages in memory.  That means when you're done, the cache history is automatically cleared.  That's a handy feature, and saves you having to delete the worthless cache files later.  I've found in the past that even when you tell IE to clear the cache AND IT SAYS IT DID, that it doesn't always clear it.  Fuckin' wonderful.  ANOTHER reason to use Firefox.

So, today's lesson is: USE FIREFOX if IE gives you any shit.  You don't need to take crap from a freakin' browser.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on February 01, 2009, 09:02:03 PM
I'm a tech-head and may be confusing some of you.  Here's an informative post that Emily from a post found on "Our Paradise Island" that may explain it better than I generally do:

Hide IP Next Generation
Most of the apps that hide you IP really only hide it from you. Even in the old days, you couldn't 'spoof' your IP address, no matter how great a hacker you were. Why? Because the server (which has pages that you load) has to send the packets (binary information) somewhere or you wont see the page loading or any pages at all. If you give a fake IP address, then nothing is going to load in your browser cause the server is sending its packets to the fake IP address and not your True IP address. So, how can you accomplish hiding you IP or what is known as anonymous web surfing? Well, it depends on who you are trying to fool.

Remember, the packets have to have somewhere to go, some browser to load. You can send the packets to your True IP or you can use what is called a Proxy Server, that is, a server that will go to the site instead of you, and relay the packets to your true IP address, so the pages will load. But there are different types of proxy servers. An understanding of what kind of proxy servers are available and what they do will better help you understand if you are truly surfing anonymous. There are 3 different classes of proxy servers in cyber space.

1) Transparant Proxy: In cyber space, shaking hands is done quite a bit. Especially when one server meets another. The first thing done is hand shaking. And a transparent proxy will shake hands with the server and say basically, "Hello, I'm a proxy server for WhiteKnight, his ISP is Metrocast and his IP address is 123.456.789.000." Plus other details are revealed, like what browser you are using (tells the server how to display the page) what operating system is being used, not everyone uses Windows, BTW. And other details are always given out. The advantage of an Invisible proxy server is that most of the time they are fast and wont slow down your surfing. The huge disadvantage is that you are hiding nothing and can fool really no one. A Transparent proxy tells all and shows all. Why would someone use one? Well they are fast and they probably don't know the difference between proxy servers

2) Next in the list is called Anonymous proxy servers. Like the others they shake hands with the server and merely say, "Hello, I'm a proxy server." and that is about it. An anonymous proxy wont tell the server who it is a proxy for or what the True IP address is (but SySAdmins have tools at their disposal to find out just about anything on your machine, depending on how ethical the SysAdmin is). Ever heard of web bugs and web worms? I will discuss what an Administrator can do later, but now, let us continue with the last class of Proxy servers.

3) 3ed is called High Anonymous (and sometimes called elite anonymous, but be careful here, sometime an elite could be a cross between a High Anon and an Anonymous. Using the examples above, all a High Anon will do with a server is shake hands. It won't tell the server that it is a proxy and it wont reveal to the server your True IP address. Just shaking hands is all your browser does when it tries to load a page on a server. So, in effect, a High Anonymous server acts more like a regular IE or Firefox browser than a proxy. It is a true attempt at fooling the serve about the IP address and who is loading the pages on that server.

Enter stage left: Software like Hide IP Next Generation. The most important thing that piece of software can do is find proxy servers for you and test them to see if 1) if they are still active and 2) how fast they are. A transparent proxy will zip, quick like a bunny, from site to site, cause it isn't trying to hide anything from the server. Anonymous servers are slower, cause most servers have security protocol in place that will question an Anonymous server on things like, well, if you are proxy, then who are your serving? In the Knights opinion, I haven't found a Hide IP program that is worth its salt.

Sure they can find proxy's for you, but they have a hard time testing them. Most Anonymous Surfing software can rarely find High Anon proxy's that aren't slower than granny going upstairs with a broken legs. The ones that they do find is put into the rotation, and there is no way of testing them, if they die and are no longer working (so you could be waiting for a week and a half (over stated, but most will know what I mean) for a page to load). When you do find a good working High Anon proxy, you will find that just about everyone else has found it as well. The Knight can't tell you the number of time he has found a simi-fast High Anon proxy and went to RapidShare to download a file (trying to get by the time limitations) only to have RapidShare say that the IP address is already in use.

With the years that the Knight has had in computer security, he can tell you that there is absolutely nothing you can do on a computer that can't be traced right back to the chair you are sitting in while you do it. All servers keep logs, even the proxy servers. Some bend to government demands while other wont. But in the end, it is he surfer who is taking the chance. Just ask Peter Townsend of The Who about Kiddie Porn and how they busted him.

Now, let us talk about who is fooling who, when it comes to proxy servers. In the old days, they didn't have codes like JAVA. JAVA is a sweet code and it has advanced the web, web deployment and web interaction farther than any other codes. Most SysAdmins use JAVA and they wont let you load their pages unless you have JAVA enabled. Why? Cause they wont have to take your IP address from some stinking proxy, they can take it right off your machine, so proxy away, if you think it will make any difference. Web bugs and web worms are products of JAVA script and can be employed and deployed in a variety of ways. Most are used for security reason, but whose security are we talking about, hmm? All of use have seen what is known as 'mouse traps' on web pages, yes?

A 'mouse trap' is where the page makers disable functions of your mouse, like right click will be disabled, or there is no 'back button' on the page. But all this can be filtered away, if you know how. If you want to surf as anonymous as you can these days. Plus, if you want to filter out all the codes that disable you from doing and using all the functions of your mouse,and fool a webmaster the best you can now-a-day, then get and learn how to use Proxomitron
Code:

http://homepage.usask.ca/~ijm451/prox/

It is the best web filter the Knight has found out in cyber space. It has a feature that will allow you to test proxy servers not only to see how fast they are, but if they are truly high anon.

But just remember what has already been said: there's nothing you can do on the net that can't be traced back to you. A lot of it will depend on how hard they want to try and trace you. Mostly, law enforcement will gather low hanging fruit before they go after someone savvy enough to employ a web filter that will send the investigators all over hell and half the known world.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: beth84 on February 05, 2009, 02:28:39 PM
ok, I have a question.

I've kinda been wondering about what this harsh UK law about extreme porn and tighter restrictions means for little old me   ::):

I did ask advice about a proxy server but I was reading over this post and I noticed that AOL users don't have to worry as much.  I just wanted to check if this is true cos I do all my surfing through AOL, don't use Internet Explorer so should I be ok?
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on February 05, 2009, 09:52:31 PM
EVERYONE on AOL is running behind a proxy... websites cannot see your real IP address if you're coming in via AOL. 

I wasn't aware that AOL had a presence in the UK... ya learn something every day!  Beth, your IP resolves to cache-yyy-xxxx.proxy.aol.com   The yyy was 3 letters, maybe a city or area code, and the xxxx was a mix of letters and numbers, which MAY identify you to AOL... those 4 digits alone could describe up to 1.67 million different people; the 3 digit 'city' or 'location' part can describe 17,000 areas, with 1.67million unique people per area.  It's a random number to us folks here out on the 'net, but I'm certain it means something to AOL.

AOL may very well cough up any access logs to the government.  Here in the US, it takes a court order, and can ONLY be on the 'person of interest'.  The cops / government / thought police here in the US can't ask for 'every access for this day' or 'every access to THIS set of websites... they're not allowed to go hunting for potential wrong-doers.  I know privacy laws are different in other countries, and I don't know at all how it works there in the UK.  I *do* know that Finland has very lax privacy laws, and will cough up EVERYTHING that the government asks for (check the wiki on the anon.penet.fi remailer debacle (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anon.penet.fi) 15 years ago.)

I'm not sure how secure you are if you're doing chat or e-mail, however.  E-mail almost always includes the sender's IP address, unless you're careful and only use a web-based client (which AOL's proxy would spoof).  Chat or IM is a whole different protocol, and don't know zip about whether it also runs through their NAT / proxy.  I would automatically assume not, but that's 'cos I'm paranoid.  If you have a friend that's NOT on AOL that you know well, try the trick to see if you can make your IM / chat client puke up the IP address (send a picture or file and look at the connection log).

Until it's settled one way or the other, I'd suggest adding another SECURE proxy in Germany... it can't hurt.  It'll only slow you down a small amount, and will hide everything that AOL is seeing now (where you surf, how long you're there and what you look at.)  Due to the number of customers, I don't know how long (or IF) they keep the access logs.  With such a high volume of traffic, they may only turn the logs on WHEN ORDERED TO BY THE COURTS / GOVERNMENT.  It's a shitload of data to keep around... it'd cost them literally tens to hundreds of thousands of dollars per day to add another day's worth of logs.

Here's an open call if we have any members that are lawyers there in the UK: what are UK privacy laws like?  Does this new 'anti-violence' law compromise existing privacy laws?
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Nero on February 06, 2009, 05:14:55 PM
Here's an open call if we have any members that are lawyers there in the UK: what are UK privacy laws like?  Does this new 'anti-violence' law compromise existing privacy laws?

Not a lawyer, but do know my stuff.   The UK has NO privacy laws.  None at all.  However, the European Union does have such laws and they do apply to the UK.   Various UK citizens have already successfully won lawsuits regarding privacy breaches - see this story as it does directly relate to BDSM: 

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2008/jul/24/mosley.newsoftheworld

The UK has similar principles to the US when it comes to requesting access to privately held information (or private property).  A warrant would need to be obtained, and this warrant would have to specify a particular person (a "person of interest", as you put it) as the subject of the warrant.  The police couldn't just go on a "fishing expedition" and trawl through server logs looking for access to "violent" websites.   The only exception to this would be when the server logs belong to the website itself.   If the cops found a website that contained kiddy porn (for example) than they would undoubtedly look at the server logs for that site to see who had been accessing the site.   They could do this on the grounds that there was prima facie evidence that a crime had been committed and that anyone who had accessed the site was potentially a suspect.

As far as ISPs are concerned, from what I can see from the European privacy laws, if all the access logs were requested then any information identifying individuals would have to be erased.   In any case, ISPs are NOT required to keep access logs for ever.

However, when Pete Townshend was busted, wasn't he traced through his credit card details rather than his IP address?   It's much easier to prove intent when someone has paid for a service, as opposed to just accessing a site.  Site accesses might not prove much, unless you could show that the person had downloaded and kept offending material.   Under UK law, the authorities would have to prove not only that you had accessed ravishu.com but that you had also downloaded and possessed violent material.  I don't think that just visiting this site would be an offense.

In any case, I suspect that unless the UK authorities know about ravishu.com then there is no way that they can know that UK citizens are visiting this site.   

Finally, to answer Ropefiend's question - the new anti-violence laws don't allow UK authorities to bypass existing laws.    I suspect that prosecutions under this law will most likely occur when someone sends in their computer for service and violent porn is discovered on the hard drive.  This is not necessarily a breach of privacy - if the service department were only doing their job.   
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on February 06, 2009, 07:59:52 PM
If anyone cares, OUR server is in the US, under US privacy laws.  If you're outside of the US, we will cheerfully ignore any fishing expeditions OR subpoenas for access details for our foreign members.   :angel:  Push come to shove, we back up the forum database every evening, and I'll wipe the server before I'll hand the access details out to ANY foreign power, 'friendly' or not.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on February 07, 2009, 02:50:58 AM
I'll back RF 100%.  We can police our own here.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Nero on February 07, 2009, 05:07:13 AM
Well, yeah.  That's what I was thinking.   :D

I knew you guys wouldn't play ball with those UK cops

 :emot_101010.gif:
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on February 07, 2009, 08:12:55 PM
Info-share with the repressive Brit government?  HELL no!  As far as I'm concerned, NO government has the right to regulate what you do in the bedroom between consenting adults OR what you fantasize about.  If I were in the UK at the moment, I'd be seriously thinking about violent overthrow of the government.  Fuckin' tools telling me *I* shouldn't get off on InquisitionLive would get a refresher lesson on how they got their ass handed to 'em 200 years ago.

And since we're housed in Texas at the moment, that local attitude of "Fuck y'all!" comes into play.  They're a real strange bunch out here, and don't play well with others.  The cops here would tell the Brit government the same thing that WE at RavishU would... go piss up a rope!  Texas is a rowdier bunch than normal Americans; hangin' ain't outta line for our public SERVANTS if they get all uppity.

Parliament should NEVER have come down on law-abiding citizens AND their legal fantasies merely because of ONE FUCKING NUT.  You put the nut in jail or a straight-jacket, and get on with life.  That whole attitude that ONE LOONIE means the whole damned BDSM community is on the verge of running out and turning violent DUE TO FANTASIES purely boggles my mind.  And it flies ass-backwards in the face of established trends: easier access to 'rough porn' has resulted in FEWER violent assaults.  By restricting it, they'll be CAUSING the very thing they're trying to limit.  America tried that (briefly) with Prohibition, and look how well we did with THAT debacle: we *created* the need for a Mafia / organized crime to supply what the 'decent' people wanted.  90 years later, Prohibition is a dim memory, but we STILL have the organized crime.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: beth84 on February 07, 2009, 09:48:32 PM
 :emot_clap.gif: :emot_101010.gif:


you go, RF! 

Thats what makes me so angry about this stupid law - one fuckwit had to go and spoil it for the rest of us.  Grrr!
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on February 08, 2009, 10:48:56 PM
All the scientific studies still show that when porn is accessible that sex crimes go down not up.  I'd rather keep the pervs having fun at their computers that raping women in real life.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on February 23, 2009, 10:10:49 PM
A friend told me about this proxy service:

anonnymouse.org

It seems to work pretty well.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: lilybeth on March 08, 2009, 11:48:48 PM
I've got a question... Is 'anonymous' surfing truly necessary? I'm not online much outside of doing very vanilla research for something I'm writing. I rarely, if ever, go to adult/porn/fantasy sites, only use the yahoo messenger/email with family/publishers. This site is the first I've ever wanted to become more familiar with.

After reading all your posts, which were truly remarkable, btw, you people know your shit, I cringe at the thought of messing with proxies. The ones I've tried in the past didn't work with myspace where I keep up with what's happening with family, etc. and got totally blocked at a private site that I'm participating in for research for an upcoming story. And the lag time truly sucked! I know enough about how the web works to figure out most general problems but no where near enough to be dangerous. I loathe the thought of messing with it.

So do I really need to be anonymous?
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on March 09, 2009, 12:24:56 AM
Probably not.  Even in the UK my bet is they are looking for those that download stuff.

But really it all depends on your comfort zone and how much you trust your government.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: RopeFiend on March 09, 2009, 01:12:46 AM
Lilybeth, I just checked your location (one of the EXCELLENT reasons to use a proxy: hide your 'location-by-IP' ;) ) and you don't need to worry about the government THERE unless you're under age, and fer Christ's sake, you're 18 or over, RIGHT?!?

You're absolutely correct, the lag time can be anywhere from minimal to excruciating.  If it's bothersome, I use a different proxy.

Another reason to use a proxy particularly with sites like ours is if other people can access your computer.  I've scared the shit out of 4 gals by mentioning some of my fantasy PLAY ideas, even though I only want to PLAY (i.e. consensual 'rape fantasy').  If you have vanilla roommates, they might freak at a site like this in your cache, MRU list, etc.  Tracks exist all over the place once you go surfing, and merely clearing the cache won't eliminate all of the traces.  However, using a 'secure' (HTTPS) highly-anonymous proxy means that nothing incriminating winds up anywhere on the computer - no browser that I know of keeps HTTPS pages in the cache, and the URLs are stealthed by the proxy so the MRUs won't show anything, either.

MRU = Most Recently Used, like the last 100 or so URLs you've typed, pages you've accessed or search terms.  Windows keeps a ridiculously large number of different types of MRUs as well as a HISTORY that doesn't get wiped when you clear the IE cache.

If any of that makes a difference to you (someone finding 'rape play' stuff on your PC) then yeah, I'd use a proxy.  The only way anyone is ever gonna find it on MY computer is with a court warrant, and I have enough stuff on harddrives that it's fairly obvious what I enjoy.  I don't hide it on my PCs except for one tiny Sony laptop that goes on the road with me.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: lilybeth on March 09, 2009, 03:39:42 PM
Lilybeth, I just checked your location (one of the EXCELLENT reasons to use a proxy: hide your 'location-by-IP' ;) ) and you don't need to worry about the government THERE unless you're under age, and fer Christ's sake, you're 18 or over, RIGHT?!?

Never had to worry about hiding my location before.  I was under the impression that other people finding my IP was only possible with YIM or email. If there is something to just hide my location by IP, I must of missed that.

And yes, I'm over 18, over double 18.  :o

Another reason to use a proxy particularly with sites like ours is if other people can access your computer.  I've scared the shit out of 4 gals by mentioning some of my fantasy PLAY ideas, even though I only want to PLAY (i.e. consensual 'rape fantasy').  If you have vanilla roommates, they might freak at a site like this in your cache, MRU list, etc.  Tracks exist all over the place once you go surfing, and merely clearing the cache won't eliminate all of the traces.  However, using a 'secure' (HTTPS) highly-anonymous proxy means that nothing incriminating winds up anywhere on the computer - no browser that I know of keeps HTTPS pages in the cache, and the URLs are stealthed by the proxy so the MRUs won't show anything, either.

Nobody touches my pc but me. That's not a problem in the slightest so I've never really worried about having stuff in the cache or MRU list. I can't imagine being scared about play ideas but then I haven't read everything here yet. My biggest concern would be someone liking what I write a little too much and trying to track me down.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: the_lecher on March 09, 2009, 04:08:33 PM
Thats what makes me so angry about this stupid law - one fuckwit had to go and spoil it for the rest of us.  Grrr!

Actually, it wasn't one fuckwit who spoiled it.  It was your government, aided and abetted by all of the fuckwits who put that government in power and refuse to hold it accountable.  (I'm not implying that you are among their numbers.  I'm merely pointing out the government taking away the rights and freedoms of law-abiding citizens is never the fault of some criminal.)


Edit:
By the way... 188 posts since last September?  You're rocking out here!  Keep it up.  (Wait, that's my job, isn't it?)
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: beth84 on March 09, 2009, 04:42:52 PM


Actually, it wasn't one fuckwit who spoiled it.  It was your government, aided and abetted by all of the fuckwits who put that government in power and refuse to hold it accountable.  (I'm not implying that you are among their numbers.  I'm merely pointing out the government taking away the rights and freedoms of law-abiding citizens is never the fault of some criminal.)


Edit:
By the way... 188 posts since last September?  You're rocking out here!  Keep it up.  (Wait, that's my job, isn't it?)


I know, I know, I was just being slightly irrational.  Its definitely a whole series of people not just one guy and I am so not amongst them.


I'll definitely keep it up.  Do I get a prize for rocking out?   ;)
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: the_lecher on March 09, 2009, 05:56:27 PM
Do I get a prize for rocking out?   ;)

A prize?  Perhaps a surprise.  (That's two sentence fragments in this post already.  I don't know what's wrong with me today.)

Just be sure to not look over your shoulder from time to time.

Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: The Aggressor on March 22, 2009, 09:45:50 PM
I feel the Uk law is simply without merit.  As far as I know, studies done (I think I recall one from Sweden in particular) show that people who utilize outlets like this are by far the minority of those who commit violent sex crimes.  As far as I've seen, nobody here is telling or recruiting people to go out and commit VSC.  It has always been shown that outlets of these types, whether it be a psychologist, girlfriend, or a group of people with the same feelings almost always keeps fantasy from merging with reality.   ;)
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: MONARCH73 on November 06, 2009, 02:05:50 PM
There are 2 programs which might be of interest in the area of privacy.
The first, -E-coder- is an IM encryption program. Its pretty easy to use, but BOTH parties need to have installed. (It acts as an IM service.)
The second, is used to conceal the existence of a segregated section of memory on your HD. It is a little fussy to use, but once you figure it out, it is IMPOSSIBLE for a third party to find ANY files placed within it. As a matter of fact, a directory search won't even reveal the segrated memory cache even exists! Your HD merely looks smaller. (Minus the size of the cache)
If anyone is interested, I can post a RS link.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: MONARCH73 on November 06, 2009, 02:35:21 PM
Here is the True Crypt website DL link:True Crypt (http://www.truecrypt.org/downloads)
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: JOHN1445 on December 28, 2010, 11:41:37 AM
hello all grt info
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Ronaldinho on January 22, 2011, 02:32:31 AM
Thanks for the information
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: SeanJulian on July 24, 2011, 03:00:54 PM
Better than proxies are VPN (Virtual private network) providers. Not only all of your traffic is encrypted using the best algorithms...your speed is not affected.

Of course you can google and find some free ones, but I use Witopia and Strongvpn...both charge monthly and yearly fees but they are worth it. They give you IP addresses in different countries as well, along with your VPN connection.

Just my 0.2C
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: innout on January 10, 2012, 06:40:13 AM
Thanks for this thread. Great info inside. I'll keep everything in mind.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: adc81791 on February 11, 2014, 11:41:29 AM
Great stuff
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Zen1965 on February 14, 2014, 06:52:51 PM
Thanks for all the info! ::):
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Copperplate on June 07, 2014, 03:00:37 PM
thanks for sticky
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Cate on August 02, 2014, 02:02:49 AM
Thanks for all this info!
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: tony23 on January 06, 2015, 12:18:18 AM
thanks for the info, never really knew about proxies! 
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on February 12, 2017, 01:32:24 AM
Since spammers use proxies, many of them are blocked by websites.  I'm beginning to think VPNs are the way to go.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: alphatier on October 21, 2017, 03:55:27 PM
Since spammers use proxies, many of them are blocked by websites.  I'm beginning to think VPNs are the way to go.

Using proxy servers / Tor is getting harder by the day. Almost any IP seems to be marked down as spam now and I don't know how a VPN is supposed to help here. It's just another IP to be abused and if the trend continues at this rate posting anonymously will be impossible by the end of the year. :-(

Getting this shit all the time now

- Not Acceptable!

An appropriate representation of the requested resource could not be found on this server. This error was generated by Mod_Security.

- Access denied. Your IP address is blacklisted. If you feel this is in error please contact your hosting provider's abuse department.

- 403 Permission Denied   FORBIDDEN
Sorry, we're blocking hack attempts, and that includes all access from 'server farms'
that don't follow up on internet abuse reports. If you're trying to come in through
a proxy hosted on one of these malicious 'server farms' then you'll have to choose a
different proxy on a server that DOES respect the rules.

---

P.S. I had to change my IP like two dozen times before I could even post that comment even though I had just posted in a different thread. Hard to believe you get that much spam.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: Lois on December 26, 2017, 06:41:58 PM
The tech handles it.
Title: Re: Proxies 101: How to protect your privacy
Post by: freeros on January 22, 2019, 02:56:56 PM
It seems like a lot of the rosinstrument proxy servers won't let me log in here. Are there other similar options?